Tag Archives: Community Archaeology

Scottish Archaeology Month!

http://www.archaeologyscotland.org.uk/index.php?q=node/33

Yes its here, and ready to go…  archaeology Month in Scotland..  known as …   you guessed it.

Scottish Archaeology Month!

Scottish Archaeology Month (SAM) is one of Archaeology Scotland’s best loved initiatives. Through SAM, they aim to make the archaeology of Scotland as accessible as possible to the public through a programme of free events that celebrate Scotland’s archaeological heritage.

There are events for all ages and abilities and even a separate SAM for schools! programme.

This year events include medieval entertainments, stalls and stories at the ‘Medieval Village’, Leven Prom and a chance for kids to join the Scottish Crannog Centre’s ‘Underwater Time Team’ and try out underwater archaeology in the mini tank, while the Principal Curator of Roman Archaeology at the National Museums will take a tour group around one of Scotland’s finest hillforts, Traprain Law. See our 2009 Events Guide for this year’s highlights.

New events will be added to our online SAM Events Calendar throughout the summer.

Scottish Archaeology Month is the sister event of Doors Open Days (DOD), which gives you free access to hundreds of fascinating buildings across Scotland each September.

Together, SAM and DOD are Scotland’s contribution to European Heritage Days, which take place throughout Europe each September. SAM and DOD are supported by Historic Scotland.

I myself am doing three secret events 🙂

But if you want …  come along to the first at the lost chapel of Old Pentland (near Ikea Edinburgh) from 11am on Saturday 12th
This is a great time to be in Scotland and enjoying all the archaeology history and heritage we have to offer!

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Past Horizons – Issue 8 online Now

Full version  http://publications.pasthorizons.tv/?id=pasthorizonsmay09

PDF Version http://www.scribd.com/doc/15572373/Past-Horizons-May-2009-Issue-8

Issue 8 - Past Horizons Online Magazine

Issue 8 - Past Horizons Online Magazine

Editorial
Challenge yourself.

News stories from around the world.

The Great Arab Revolt Project
Archaeology in the Jordanian desert through the eyes of volunteer Susan Daniels.

Bamburgh Research Project
Archaeology is in itself a destructive process and as a result needs to be fully recorded. The media department at the Bamburgh Research Project was created to experiment with video recording as a means to deal more fully with this issue. Gerard Twomey, the media director, explains the ideas behind this successful project.

Where the Camel meets the Canoe
A team of Yale University academics have set up the Timbuktu Research Project in response to the worsening environmental conditions in this remote region. Their research has led them to conclude this is not the first time Timbuktu has faced this particular dilemma.

Gloucester’s Itinerant Diggers
Archaeologist Austin Ainsworth on the launch of an exciting heritage project for Gloucester’s homeless community.

Dig In
Archaeological volunteer digs and field schools for 2009.

Beneath the Bricks
A local group turns potential conflict into a positive outcome for the community in a historic Louisiana town.

Profile
Archaeologist Douglas Post Park.

Dig Cook
Culinary escapades from Annie

Interested In…
Distance learning.

Viewpoint
David Connolly discusses what archaeology means to him.

Back Pages
Alternative Diggers’ Photo Archive.  (are you in there??)

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PROFESSIONAL TRAINING IN THE HISTORIC ENVIRONMENT 2008/9

OXFORD UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION
OXFORD UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION

OXFORD UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION

 

PROFESSIONAL TRAINING IN THE HISTORIC ENVIRONMENT 2008/9

 

 In partnership with English Heritage

In association with the Archaeology Training Forum, the IFA and IHBC

 

 

Making the Most of Community Archaeology: Options and Case-Studies for the Professional

Monday 17 November 2008

Course Director: Richard Hall (York Archaeological Trust)

Community Archaeology allows professional archaeologists to meet the needs of local planning authorities and the desires of local groups. The benefits and opportunities of Community Archaeology are many, and include; facilitating public access to common heritage, promoting independent research, extending outreach to people with particular needs and simple good public relations. This course will introduce you to the contexts in which you are likely to become involved in Community Archaeology and will demonstrate many ways in which it can be included in project planning and delivered on the ground.

Fee: £135.00 with lunch, £125.00 without lunch

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7253

 

Interpreting Architectural Drawings and Records

Thursday 20 November 2008

Course Director: Gordon Higgott (English Heritage)

Architectural drawings, plans and related graphic records, including estate maps and topographical views, often provide the most valuable contemporary evidence for the dating and interpretation of historic buildings and sites. This course will examine the many types of original visual material available to researchers and explain methods of evaluating such evidence. It will be relevant to historic building consultants, archaeologists, conservation architects, and those involved in the research of building histories for conservation plans and statements of significance.

Fee: £135.00 with lunch, £125.00 without lunch

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7254

 

Tools for Appraising and Managing Conservation Areas

Tuesday 25 November 2008

Course Director: Charles Wagner (English Heritage)

This course investigates the different techniques that have emerged over recent years for appraising and assessing historic areas, and discusses the different uses of these techniques to help in the management of conservation areas. It is aimed towards those working in local authorities managing conservation areas and those in historic environment consultancies offering surveying services, as well as those in the voluntary sector who are seeking partnerships with their local authority to better understand their historic area. 

Fee: £135.00 with lunch, £125.00 without lunch

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7255

 

Conservation Management Plans and Statements

Thursday 27 November 2008

Course Director: Stephen Bond (Heritage Consultant)

Conservation management plans are either a great waste of paper or an absolutely vital tool for managing any heritage site. This course will introduce the process, show you how to write a statement of significance, teach you how to read a plan and explore the ways in which a plan can be used.  At the end, you can make your own mind up.

Fee: £135.00 with lunch, £125.00 without lunch

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7256

 

Aerial Photography: Archaeological Interpretation and Mapping

Wednesday 3 – Thursday 4 December 2008

Course Directors: Yvonne Boutwood and Helen Winton (English Heritage)

Aerial photography is one of the most cost-effective and productive ways of identifying and understanding archaeological sites and landscapes. Aerial photographs are extremely valuable for effective archaeological research and conservation but few people have formal training in their use. This course informs historic environment professionals of the potential and practical use of aerial photographs for research and heritage management.

Fee: £350.00 residential with meals, £300.00 non-residential with meals, £275.00 non-residential without meals.

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7257

 

Post-Excavation Assessment

Monday 26 January 2009

Course Director: Tony Wilmott (English Heritage)

Post-excavation assessments became an integral part of archaeological project designs under English Heritage’s MAP2 – replaced by Management of Research Projects in the Historic Environment (MoRPHE) in 2006 – but despite the formalisation of the review process, mechanistic over-documentation of data all too often takes the place of critical evaluation and interpretation. This course explores the principles of post-excavation assessments and discusses publication plans for post-excavation work.

Fee: £135.00 with lunch, £125.00 without lunch

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7258

 

Characterisation: Current Approaches

Wednesday 28 January 2009

Course Director: Roger M Thomas (English Heritage)

Characterisation is now firmly established as a valuable way of approaching the protection and management of the overall historic environment. A wide variety of characterisation-based initiatives, concerning different aspects of the historic environment, is now in progress. This course will review current approaches, with a particular emphasis on newly developed (or developing) methodologies and applications.

Fee: £135.00 with lunch, £125.00 without lunch

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7259

 

Health and Safety for Historic Environment Professionals

Monday 2 – Tuesday 3 February 2009

Course Director: Paul Jeffery (English Heritage)

Historic Environment workers operate in many different types of locations and situations, which can result in a variety of risks and personal hazards. This course offers a detailed review of Health & Safety Law and demonstrates how to identify and reduce risks to both staff and the public. It also includes practical advice on how to identify and select appropriate tools and clothing for outdoor working, and addresses some issues for those working alone, or in small teams, in remote and hostile environments.

Fee: £350.00 residential with meals, £300.00 non-residential with meals, £275.00 non-residential without meals.

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7260

 

Military Archaeology: Current Professional Approaches and Practice

Tuesday 10 February 2009

Course Director: Wayne Cocroft (English Heritage)

Modern military sites due to their scale, complexity and the myriad of documentary sources are some of the most challenging historic assets to assess.  This course will explore how heritage professionals are adapting traditional practices and developing new methods of working to record, analyse, understand, conserve and manage these places. 

Fee: £135.00 with lunch, £125.00 without lunch

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7261

 

Supporting People, Sustaining Buildings

Friday 13 February 2009

Course Director: Diana Evans (English Heritage)

Caring for an historic place of worship is a challenge for which congregations often find themselves to be ill-equipped. While grants are one way to help, access to expertise, experience and encouragement is equally valuable. In an effort to help congregations to help themselves, EH has created the dedicated post of Historic Places of Worship Support Officer. The course will explore the role and the skills needed to fulfil it.

Fee: £135.00 with lunch, £125.00 without lunch

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7262

 

Environmental Assessment and the Cultural Heritage

Wednesday 18 – Thursday 19 February 2009

Course Director: George Lambrick (Archaeology and Heritage Consultant)

This course aims to inform participants about the principles of environmental assessment and its role in managing how the cultural heritage is affected by development, both at strategic and project level. The principles and good practice standards that the course will cover have much wider application than just to the formal environmental assessment processes. It should appeal to anyone with a background or interest in planning and/or heritage conservation, operating in commercial, national agency, local authority, independent and university environments.

Fee: £350.00 residential with meals, £300.00 non-residential with meals, £275.00 non-residential without meals.

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7263

 

Information Skills and Resources for Historic Environment Professionals

Wednesday 25 February 2009

Course Director: Dr Stuart Jeffrey (Archaeology Data Service)

The Heritage Sector is increasingly dependant on large volumes of information created, stored and disseminated in digital formats, including via the internet. This course is designed to give historic environment professionals a clear understanding of the range of opportunities, choices and challenges digital information management techniques offer and the skills to best take advantage of them.

Fee: £135.00 with lunch, £125.00 without lunch

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7264

 

Public Inquiry Workshop

Wednesday 18 – Friday 20 March 2009

Course Director: Roger M Thomas (English Heritage)

This practical course introduces potential witnesses and advocates to the techniques and procedures of Public Inquiries dealing with the historic environment. Training will be given in the preparation of proofs of evidence and a mock Inquiry will be staged in front of an experienced Inspector and led by practising advocates. The Inquiry process will be videoed as a basis for detailed feedback.

Fee: £510.00 residential with meals, £410.00 non-residential with meals, £350.00 non-residential without meals.

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7265

 

An Introduction to Architecture for Archaeologists

Monday 30 March – Tuesday 31 March 2009

Course Director: Dr Adam Menuge (English Heritage)

This course is a brief introduction to dating architectural styles and provides a simple ‘tool kit’ for archaeologists who may need corroborating dating evidence to unravel the sites or landscapes on which they are working.  It will outline approaches to the interpretation of architectural evidence and explore the evolution of architectural styles from the pre-Conquest period to the 20th century.  It will also look at a series of key building types – especially churches, polite and vernacular housing, and industrial buildings – emphasising the principal characteristics which assist dating.

Fee: £350.00 residential with meals, £300.00 non-residential with meals, £275.00 non-residential without meals.

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7266

 

The Rural Historic Environment: Heritage Management in the Countryside of the 21st Century

Thursday 2 – Friday 3 April 2009

Course Director: Stephen Trow (English Heritage)

The historic environment is fundamental to the character and prosperity of the countryside and its continued conservation is inextricably linked to land use and agricultural policy. At a time of significant change in rural public policy, this course takes a broad view of the issues and examines the linkages between policy, research and practical outcomes which will shape the countryside of 21st century England.

Fee: £350.00 residential with meals, £300.00 non-residential with meals, £275.00 non-residential without meals.

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7267

 

Area Assessments of the Historic Environment

Wednesday 8 April 2009

Course Director: Dr Adam Menuge (English Heritage)

Area assessments aim to ensure that historical understanding informs the management of change in the built environment not just at the level of individual buildings but across the small and medium-scale historic landscapes that constitute ‘places’, particularly when these are faced by rapid change or steady incremental loss. They aim to provide an overview of the historical development and architectural character of towns, suburbs and rural settlements and an assessment of their current state and future value. This course will introduce the principles and methods of area assessments and provide practical guidance on their implementation – this will be particularly valuable in a climate of Housing Market Renewal Initiatives.

Fee: £135.00 with lunch, £125.00 without lunch

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7268

 

Historic Gardens, Parks and Designed Landscapes: Identifying Threats and Developing Strategies for their Conservation

Thursday 16 – Friday 17 April 2009

Course Director: John Watkins (English Heritage)

Recent research (including Heritage at Risk, 2008) has shown that many of England’s historic gardens, parks and designed landscapes, both urban and rural, are at risk from development pressures and decline. This situation has arisen due to under-investment and a deficit of skills to effectively manage and maintain them. This course aims to examine and understand these threats and challenges whilst identifying and evaluating strategies and solutions for protecting, conserving and managing sites.

Fee: £350.00 residential with meals, £300.00 non-residential with meals, £275.00 non-residential without meals.

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7269

 

Archaeology Survey Week

Monday 4 May – Friday 8 May 2009

Course Directors: Mark Bowden and Trevor Pearson (English Heritage)

Analytical survey of earthwork sites and historic landscapes has a vital role to play in archaeological interpretation and conservation strategies. This five-day practical course includes a major fieldwork component, with ample opportunity for hands-on experience and the development of a range of appropriate survey skills. The tutors are archaeological field investigators from English Heritage.

Fee: £740.00 residential with meals, £540.00 non-residential with meals, £425.00 non-residential without meals.

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7270

 

Planning and the Historic Environment: The Pastoral Amendment Measure

Friday 15 May 2009

Course Director: Dr Paul Barnwell (OUDCE)

This is an annual course that explores current issues relevant to the historic environment. The theme for 2009 will be the Pastoral Amendment Measure, with a particular focus on its provision for, and the impact of, the sharing of Anglican places of worship between religious and secular activities.

Fee: £100.00 with lunch, £90.00 without lunch.

www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7271

 

Building Survey Week

Monday 25 – Friday 29 May 2009

Course Directors: Robert Hook and Dr Adam Menuge (English Heritage)

This five-day practical course will provide a general introduction to the understanding of historic buildings. The course will have an emphasis on practical, ‘portable’ skills and covers observation, investigation, analysis and recording of historic buildings. The tutors are historic building specialists from English Heritage.

Fee: £740.00 residential with meals, £540.00 non-residential with meals, £425.00 non-residential without meals.

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7272

 

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Community Archaeology – Healthy Scene or Deathbed Gasp?

Current Archaeology   The latest Current Archaeology has an opinion on Community Archaeology which is pretty damning … however BAJR quite agrees with most of it… though I did smart as I am currently working on 2 (organising one!) and am getting into training and other advice… including making templates for “How to…. ” get money OR find tools OR carry out a survey etc…… where are the resources…. etc

But its funny…. I gave a donation to a society (and it turned out my donation was the largest they had that year … even HS gave them less! So how can the clubs survive, when there is little support…

Where are the FLOs for Digs? In Scotland we have the wonderful Helen Bradley, Adopt-a-Monument Officer from the CSA who has to cover the WHOLE of Scotland – but brings valuable help to groups…

http://www.scottisharchaeology.org.uk/projects/adopt.html

Why not 5 or 10 of her? Why not more archaeology in the classroom? what about building communities with archaeology/heritage/natural resources… actually use archaeology for something positive?

Not just to mitigate for a development, but to be part of a community soul?

Last weekend, we field walked, washed, recorded, geofizzed, dug and researched… over 70 people turned up.. and more are coming for the Easter Big Dig… many are coming over the winter to learn survey and dig and draw etc etc….. new skills ! An they love it… absolutely love it!

And so do I….

I looked at the CBAs Community Archaeology Forum – a great idea… however..

http://www.britarch.ac.uk/communityarchaeology/wikka.php?wakka=HomePage

The Latest News is October (2 months ago…)

There are only 13 projects

Two finished in 2005, one was last updated in January 2006, many pages don’t work some are quite good indeed… however… you find there is only 10 actual groups involved… and spread across 2 years and the whole of the UK it is a bit …. Er…. Small?

I started a list of Groups across the UK… but felt I did not want to get in the way of the CBA site.. but I can tell you.. I could collect around 2-3000 groups! Some only 5 people others with hundreds!

So we have the desire… we have the people, we have the potential …. But where is the support… the cash? The templates? The resources?

Oooooooooo eck…. Can I feel a BAJR Crusade… have I found a new direction??There are people ot there doing lots of work, there are projects going on…  but how to find them, how to finance them and how to start them?  

 The intake of British archaeology students is down…  the chances to learn before is vague..  Mention it and people say…  ” oh..  theres lots going on”…  So I say where?   When, who can get involved…

Sarah McLean had the best idea with UK Archaeology Opportunities..  sadly the site was hijacked so don’t go there!  She has indeed been in touch and given me some useful pointers… 

Past Horizons is trying to fill the gap…  but people have to know its there..  it has to be publicised and beyond that…  people have to step forward and say…  This is going on here…!

The article leaves a lot (and I mean a LOT) to be desired in checking facts… however .. being the glass half empty person who wants to find out how to make it full… I stand by several points that are made.. albeit clumsily…

And rather than attacking County Archaeologists it should look to the real causes.. the lack of funding for HERs, the reliance on goodwill to get projects going, the lack of information available to simply explain to a group, WHO to talk to, HOW to carry out work, WHERE to get funding WHO will help, HOW to report.. etc etc…..

Let’s get it moving…
 
Read the Current Archaeology … give us an honest view…. Shooting for the stars?… or p##sin in the wind?

Go beyond the initial reaction and look at the reality… 

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