Tag Archives: Scotland

Scottish Archaeology Month!

http://www.archaeologyscotland.org.uk/index.php?q=node/33

Yes its here, and ready to go…  archaeology Month in Scotland..  known as …   you guessed it.

Scottish Archaeology Month!

Scottish Archaeology Month (SAM) is one of Archaeology Scotland’s best loved initiatives. Through SAM, they aim to make the archaeology of Scotland as accessible as possible to the public through a programme of free events that celebrate Scotland’s archaeological heritage.

There are events for all ages and abilities and even a separate SAM for schools! programme.

This year events include medieval entertainments, stalls and stories at the ‘Medieval Village’, Leven Prom and a chance for kids to join the Scottish Crannog Centre’s ‘Underwater Time Team’ and try out underwater archaeology in the mini tank, while the Principal Curator of Roman Archaeology at the National Museums will take a tour group around one of Scotland’s finest hillforts, Traprain Law. See our 2009 Events Guide for this year’s highlights.

New events will be added to our online SAM Events Calendar throughout the summer.

Scottish Archaeology Month is the sister event of Doors Open Days (DOD), which gives you free access to hundreds of fascinating buildings across Scotland each September.

Together, SAM and DOD are Scotland’s contribution to European Heritage Days, which take place throughout Europe each September. SAM and DOD are supported by Historic Scotland.

I myself am doing three secret events 🙂

But if you want …  come along to the first at the lost chapel of Old Pentland (near Ikea Edinburgh) from 11am on Saturday 12th
This is a great time to be in Scotland and enjoying all the archaeology history and heritage we have to offer!

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Jacobites’ march to be recreated at Culloden

News from my friend Tony Pollard..  that ol’ favorite of Battlefield Archaeology …

 

Battle of Culloden - re-filmed for the New Visitors Centre - from www.gloomylight.com

Battle of Culloden - re-filmed for the New Visitors Centre - from http://www.gloomylight.com

For the first time since 15 April, 1746, a team will attempt to recreate a Jacobite night march from Culloden to the outskirts of Nairn. Battlefield archaeologist Dr Tony Pollard will lead the group of re-enactors on the trek. A few thousand men drawn from Bonnie Prince Charlie’s forces tried, but failed, to surprise attack a government camp under the cover of darkness. The Jacobites turned back for Culloden just miles short of their objective. Dr Pollard, director of the Centre for Battlefield Archaeology at the University of Glasgow and an expert on Culloden, said in theory the original night march was a good idea.

 

 http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/highlands_and_islands/7937642.stm

Culloden at the National Trust for Scotland

http://www.nts.org.uk/culloden/

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Flint find at Biggar, Scotland – The earliest settlement yet found

Pit under excavation - from the Biggar Archaeology website

Pit under excavation - from the Biggar Archaeology website

Scotland’s oldest settlement, dating back 14,000 years, was near Biggar, in South Lanarkshire, archaeologists say.

The site, in a field north of the town, may have been a camp used by hunters following migrating herds of reindeer or wild horses across plains that are now covered by the North Sea. Its discovery means humans have lived in Scotland for 3,000 years longer than previously thought. Until now the earliest evidence of human habitation in the country was at Cramond, near Edinburgh, which had been radiocarbon-dated to about 8400 BC.

read more at the Times Online

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/scotland/article6069957.ece

and have a look at Biggar Archaeology website

http://www.biggararchaeology.org.uk/

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Mary Queen of Scots must be returned to Scotland ??

More than four centuries after she was executed in England for treason by her cousin, Elizabeth I, a row has broken out over the rightful resting place of Mary Queen of Scots, and her true place in the pantheon of Scottish heroes.For Christine Grahame, MSP, Mary was “an iconic historical Scots figure” and this week the SNP member for the South of Scotland will begin a campaign in the Scottish Parliament to repatriate her remains from Westminster Abbey. But the move has been branded a stunt by Ms Grahame’s political opponents and dismissed as crazy by Jenny Wormald, one of the leading academic authorities on the queen’s life and death.

There is something funny about petty nationalistic politics being played out by people who don’t really understand the past properly.. like the terrible moment in an SNP rally when we were treated to Calgacus’s speech before the crushing defeat by the Romans at Mons Graupius… er… I was forced to point out… er…. a) Scotland did not exist then… and er… they were not Scots (who came from Ireland much much later)

Speaking as a Briton from East Lothian that is ! 🙂

So as she actually wanted to be buried in France.. and her son buried her in Westminster.. just leave her alone.

<SIGH>

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Last Day of Council – First Day of Community Project

rain!!!!!!!!!!!!Well, I give up my council job today.. back to normal… Its not so much going to another job, its just getting rid of one of four!

This means I can concentrate on BAJR, Past Horizons, CHC consultants. Start the Cousland Big Dig tommorrow at 10am…

It is however pouring with rain! oh the joy of digging in Scotland!

will keep you updated day by day!

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Secrets of the Bishops emerge from graves in Scotland

The remains of Bishop Henry were found with key grave goodsThe bones of six bishops buried more than 600 years ago have been identified using new hi-tech methods.
The medieval bishops, who died between 1200-1360, were discovered during an excavation at Whithorn Priory in Galloway between 1957 and 1967.It was known the remains were of powerful churchmen of the Middle Ages, but their identities were a mystery.

But Historic Scotland research has shown when the men died, who several of them were and even what they ate.

Radiocarbon dating helped identify the graves of bishops Walter (died 1235), Henry (d. 1293), Michael (d. 1359) and Thomas (d. 1362).

The bones of six bishops buried more than 600 years ago have been identified using new hi-tech methods.
The medieval bishops, who died between 1200-1360, were discovered during an excavation at Whithorn Priory in Galloway between 1957 and 1967.

It was known the remains were of powerful churchmen of the Middle Ages, but their identities were a mystery.

But Historic Scotland research has shown when the men died, who several of them were and even what they ate.

Radiocarbon dating helped identify the graves of bishops Walter (died 1235), Henry (d. 1293), Michael (d. 1359) and Thomas (d. 1362).

This has now been identified as the grave of bishop Simon (d. 1355).

Peter Yeoman, senior archaeologist with Historic Scotland, said: “This has been a rare opportunity to build up a picture of life and death among Scotland’s rich and powerful churchmen of the Middle Ages. A chalice, platter, crozier head and ring were among the finds in the dig

“Very fine gilded altar vessels, a gold pontifical ring, and the remains of a wooden crozier were found with the skeleton in the central grave, all of which showed he was a bishop.

“But it was only when we had the radiocarbon dating that we were able to say it was probably Bishop Henry who died in 1293, who had been important in rebuilding parts of the priory after it was raided and damaged by soldiers in 1286.”

The finds made during the excavation are all in the collections of National Museums Scotland.

The research was carried out by Edinburgh-based Headland Archaeology on behalf of Historic Scotland.

This article first appeared on BBC News Scotland

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Scotland’s Rural Past – a real resource for community

Scotland’s Rural Past

http://www.scotlandsruralpast.org.uk

 Scotlands Rural Past

After my rant about lack of resources, I have been prodded and poked about some excellent resources!…   some are better than others…  but this one stands out – I wish I had been able to take up a position with them, as they are leading the way…    I can see few (if any) to match them!

It has all you could want…  an excellent website that helps…  yes HELPS!  with easy guides, links to resources…  and downloadable forms, templates and even a form that allows projects to be automatically uploaded to the RCAHMS!  just how good is that…  it has a real forum…  and photo competions..  …  oh I could go on.    

have a look at this for example – only a small part…..

How to take part
Doing Getting going
Doing research
Doing field work Survey
Recording
Notes on recording
Digital Images
Submitting data

Field Monument Identity
Photographic guidance
Writing a site description
Glossary of terms
Raising awareness
Evaluation

Heres the section on Recording

Recording

Making accurate and consistent documents of what you discover and interpret in the field is an essential part of creating a good record. To help you do this we have produced a field recording form and guidance notes which will enable you to collect all the vital information necessary to update the RCAHMS database. The guidance notes take you through how to complete the recording form, including sections on how to write a site description and definitions of the different types of site you are likely to encounter. We have also created an on-line form which will enable you to submit the data you collect to the RCAHMS database, where it will make a real contribution to our knowledge and understanding of these sites and help preserve them for the future.

So there you go…  I tip my hat….   a template and a standard to match!

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