Tag Archives: english Heritage

Current Archaeology Awards for 2010 – get your entries in!

Current Archaeology is pleased to announce that the English Heritage Presentation of Archaeological Heritage Research Awards will be joining in this year as part of the Archaeology 2010 conference at the British Museum, February 26-28, 2010. ( a date for your diary – As both BAJR and Past Horizons will be there as well)

But this is not the only award they have with the Robert Kiln Trust award and the Jeffrey May awards to name only another two. Cash prizes and lovely things to have on your CV. Closing date for all is 15 November.

English Heritage Award for the Presentation of Heritage Research competition is designed to highlight the fascinating research being done in the heritage sector. We aim to bring it out of monographs and specialist journals and to the attention of the wider public, whose understanding and support are crucial to the preservation of our heritage. Anyone who works, or has participated in, research on British and Irish archaeology, historic buildings and heritage conservation is encouraged to enter the competition.

Three prizes are offered: an open first prize of £1,500, a runner-up prize of £500, and an under-30 prize of £500. Entrants should send in a completed entry form including a summary of their proposed presentation, not to exceed 750 words (up to two figures may also be included), to arrive no later than 15 November 2009.

View details on this award here…

The Jeffrey May Award is named in honour of Jeffrey May, an issue editor for Current Archaeology and a long-term friend and supporter. The award, for the best article submitted by a new writer for either Current Archaeology or Current World Archaeology magazine, consists of a £1,000 prize and publication of the article.

View details on this award here…

The Robert Kiln Trust award is given for the best project, or a series of works or projects, carried out in the UK by a voluntary body or individual. Robert Kiln was a great believer in amateur participation and his charitable trust, founded in the early 1970s, has distributed more than £1 million to conservation, the arts and archaeology. This award is meant to carry on Robert Kiln’s tradition of encouraging higher standards of fieldwork and excavation in the amateur ranks. There will be a small prize given. Additionally, each finalist will be given two free tickets to the Archaeology 2010 conference.

View details on this award here…

So what are you waiting for….. the opportunity to get recognition and some very useful money for either yourself or your project.!! Just think what you could do with £500, £1000 or even £1500. So stop reading this… and get along to here NOW!    http://www.archaeology.co.uk/grants-awards/

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Nighthawking Report

New Survey Reveals Low Levels of Prosecution and Crime Reporting

A survey commissioned by English Heritage and supported by its counterparts across the UK and Crown Dependencies has revealed that the threat to heritage posed by illegal metal detecting, or nighthawking, is high but arrest or prosecution remains at an all time low and penalties are woefully insufficient.

The Nighthawking Survey, published today (16th February 2009), found out that over a third of sites attacked by illegal metal detectorists between 1995 and 2008 are Scheduled Monuments and another 152 undesignated sites are also known to have been raided, but secrecy surrounding the crime means that it is significantly under-reported. Only 26 cases have resulted in formal legal action, with the punishment usually being a small fine from as little as £38. (Illegally parking a car carries a £120 fine.)

The crime is most prevalent in the central and eastern counties but rare in the west and south-west and almost unheard of in Northern Ireland and the Crown Dependencies. Counties where the highest incidences of nighthawking have been reported are (in descending order): Lincolnshire, Norfolk, Suffolk, Essex, Kent, Oxfordshire, and the Yorkshire region. ‘Honey pot’ sites such as Roman sites are often targeted repeatedly and the period after ploughing is the most common time, with considerable damage caused to crops and fields.

Illegal metal detecting is the search and removal of antiquities from the ground using metal detectors without the permission of the landowners or on prohibited land such as Scheduled Monuments. It is a form of theft and can be prosecuted under the Theft Act.

The heart of the problem lies in the vicious circle of under-reporting of the crime, which in turn creates a false picture of the seriousness of the situation, making this a low priority crime for the police. It is also compounded by the difficulty in collecting evidence.

Over time, the lack of successful prosecution has led to the lack of confidence of the victims in the legal process. The survey found out that only 14% of landowners, when afflicted by nighthawking, have reported it to the police. Most of them responded by tackling the culprits themselves or imposing a complete ban on metal detecting on their land.

The survey also calls for the setting up of a central database of reported nighthawking incidents and a tightening of the Treasure Act requiring all who come into contact with treasure finds, not just the finder, to report them. Full details of the survey including its recommendations are downloadable from http://www.helm.org.uk/nighthawking

Professor Sir Barry Cunliffe, Interim Chairman of English Heritage, said: “Responsible metal detecting provides a valuable record of history, but illegal activities bring responsible ones into disrepute.

“Nighthawkers, by hoarding the finds or selling them on without recording or provenance, are thieves of valuable archaeological knowledge that belongs to us all. Even in the case when the finds are retrieved, the context of how and where exactly the finds were found has been lost, significantly diminishing their historical value. In the cases of internationally important material the loss of the unique evidence that these objects provide on our common history and origins is especially poignant. By establishing a clearer picture of the crime, this survey will help us to combat it more effectively.”

Read more here from teh Guardian:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uklatest/story/0,,-8360073,00.html

The suvey:

http://nighthawking.thehumanjourney.net/

The report should be here:

http://www.helm.org.uk/nighthawking

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PROFESSIONAL TRAINING IN THE HISTORIC ENVIRONMENT 2008/9

OXFORD UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION
OXFORD UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION

OXFORD UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION

 

PROFESSIONAL TRAINING IN THE HISTORIC ENVIRONMENT 2008/9

 

 In partnership with English Heritage

In association with the Archaeology Training Forum, the IFA and IHBC

 

 

Making the Most of Community Archaeology: Options and Case-Studies for the Professional

Monday 17 November 2008

Course Director: Richard Hall (York Archaeological Trust)

Community Archaeology allows professional archaeologists to meet the needs of local planning authorities and the desires of local groups. The benefits and opportunities of Community Archaeology are many, and include; facilitating public access to common heritage, promoting independent research, extending outreach to people with particular needs and simple good public relations. This course will introduce you to the contexts in which you are likely to become involved in Community Archaeology and will demonstrate many ways in which it can be included in project planning and delivered on the ground.

Fee: £135.00 with lunch, £125.00 without lunch

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7253

 

Interpreting Architectural Drawings and Records

Thursday 20 November 2008

Course Director: Gordon Higgott (English Heritage)

Architectural drawings, plans and related graphic records, including estate maps and topographical views, often provide the most valuable contemporary evidence for the dating and interpretation of historic buildings and sites. This course will examine the many types of original visual material available to researchers and explain methods of evaluating such evidence. It will be relevant to historic building consultants, archaeologists, conservation architects, and those involved in the research of building histories for conservation plans and statements of significance.

Fee: £135.00 with lunch, £125.00 without lunch

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7254

 

Tools for Appraising and Managing Conservation Areas

Tuesday 25 November 2008

Course Director: Charles Wagner (English Heritage)

This course investigates the different techniques that have emerged over recent years for appraising and assessing historic areas, and discusses the different uses of these techniques to help in the management of conservation areas. It is aimed towards those working in local authorities managing conservation areas and those in historic environment consultancies offering surveying services, as well as those in the voluntary sector who are seeking partnerships with their local authority to better understand their historic area. 

Fee: £135.00 with lunch, £125.00 without lunch

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7255

 

Conservation Management Plans and Statements

Thursday 27 November 2008

Course Director: Stephen Bond (Heritage Consultant)

Conservation management plans are either a great waste of paper or an absolutely vital tool for managing any heritage site. This course will introduce the process, show you how to write a statement of significance, teach you how to read a plan and explore the ways in which a plan can be used.  At the end, you can make your own mind up.

Fee: £135.00 with lunch, £125.00 without lunch

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7256

 

Aerial Photography: Archaeological Interpretation and Mapping

Wednesday 3 – Thursday 4 December 2008

Course Directors: Yvonne Boutwood and Helen Winton (English Heritage)

Aerial photography is one of the most cost-effective and productive ways of identifying and understanding archaeological sites and landscapes. Aerial photographs are extremely valuable for effective archaeological research and conservation but few people have formal training in their use. This course informs historic environment professionals of the potential and practical use of aerial photographs for research and heritage management.

Fee: £350.00 residential with meals, £300.00 non-residential with meals, £275.00 non-residential without meals.

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7257

 

Post-Excavation Assessment

Monday 26 January 2009

Course Director: Tony Wilmott (English Heritage)

Post-excavation assessments became an integral part of archaeological project designs under English Heritage’s MAP2 – replaced by Management of Research Projects in the Historic Environment (MoRPHE) in 2006 – but despite the formalisation of the review process, mechanistic over-documentation of data all too often takes the place of critical evaluation and interpretation. This course explores the principles of post-excavation assessments and discusses publication plans for post-excavation work.

Fee: £135.00 with lunch, £125.00 without lunch

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7258

 

Characterisation: Current Approaches

Wednesday 28 January 2009

Course Director: Roger M Thomas (English Heritage)

Characterisation is now firmly established as a valuable way of approaching the protection and management of the overall historic environment. A wide variety of characterisation-based initiatives, concerning different aspects of the historic environment, is now in progress. This course will review current approaches, with a particular emphasis on newly developed (or developing) methodologies and applications.

Fee: £135.00 with lunch, £125.00 without lunch

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7259

 

Health and Safety for Historic Environment Professionals

Monday 2 – Tuesday 3 February 2009

Course Director: Paul Jeffery (English Heritage)

Historic Environment workers operate in many different types of locations and situations, which can result in a variety of risks and personal hazards. This course offers a detailed review of Health & Safety Law and demonstrates how to identify and reduce risks to both staff and the public. It also includes practical advice on how to identify and select appropriate tools and clothing for outdoor working, and addresses some issues for those working alone, or in small teams, in remote and hostile environments.

Fee: £350.00 residential with meals, £300.00 non-residential with meals, £275.00 non-residential without meals.

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7260

 

Military Archaeology: Current Professional Approaches and Practice

Tuesday 10 February 2009

Course Director: Wayne Cocroft (English Heritage)

Modern military sites due to their scale, complexity and the myriad of documentary sources are some of the most challenging historic assets to assess.  This course will explore how heritage professionals are adapting traditional practices and developing new methods of working to record, analyse, understand, conserve and manage these places. 

Fee: £135.00 with lunch, £125.00 without lunch

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7261

 

Supporting People, Sustaining Buildings

Friday 13 February 2009

Course Director: Diana Evans (English Heritage)

Caring for an historic place of worship is a challenge for which congregations often find themselves to be ill-equipped. While grants are one way to help, access to expertise, experience and encouragement is equally valuable. In an effort to help congregations to help themselves, EH has created the dedicated post of Historic Places of Worship Support Officer. The course will explore the role and the skills needed to fulfil it.

Fee: £135.00 with lunch, £125.00 without lunch

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7262

 

Environmental Assessment and the Cultural Heritage

Wednesday 18 – Thursday 19 February 2009

Course Director: George Lambrick (Archaeology and Heritage Consultant)

This course aims to inform participants about the principles of environmental assessment and its role in managing how the cultural heritage is affected by development, both at strategic and project level. The principles and good practice standards that the course will cover have much wider application than just to the formal environmental assessment processes. It should appeal to anyone with a background or interest in planning and/or heritage conservation, operating in commercial, national agency, local authority, independent and university environments.

Fee: £350.00 residential with meals, £300.00 non-residential with meals, £275.00 non-residential without meals.

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7263

 

Information Skills and Resources for Historic Environment Professionals

Wednesday 25 February 2009

Course Director: Dr Stuart Jeffrey (Archaeology Data Service)

The Heritage Sector is increasingly dependant on large volumes of information created, stored and disseminated in digital formats, including via the internet. This course is designed to give historic environment professionals a clear understanding of the range of opportunities, choices and challenges digital information management techniques offer and the skills to best take advantage of them.

Fee: £135.00 with lunch, £125.00 without lunch

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7264

 

Public Inquiry Workshop

Wednesday 18 – Friday 20 March 2009

Course Director: Roger M Thomas (English Heritage)

This practical course introduces potential witnesses and advocates to the techniques and procedures of Public Inquiries dealing with the historic environment. Training will be given in the preparation of proofs of evidence and a mock Inquiry will be staged in front of an experienced Inspector and led by practising advocates. The Inquiry process will be videoed as a basis for detailed feedback.

Fee: £510.00 residential with meals, £410.00 non-residential with meals, £350.00 non-residential without meals.

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7265

 

An Introduction to Architecture for Archaeologists

Monday 30 March – Tuesday 31 March 2009

Course Director: Dr Adam Menuge (English Heritage)

This course is a brief introduction to dating architectural styles and provides a simple ‘tool kit’ for archaeologists who may need corroborating dating evidence to unravel the sites or landscapes on which they are working.  It will outline approaches to the interpretation of architectural evidence and explore the evolution of architectural styles from the pre-Conquest period to the 20th century.  It will also look at a series of key building types – especially churches, polite and vernacular housing, and industrial buildings – emphasising the principal characteristics which assist dating.

Fee: £350.00 residential with meals, £300.00 non-residential with meals, £275.00 non-residential without meals.

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7266

 

The Rural Historic Environment: Heritage Management in the Countryside of the 21st Century

Thursday 2 – Friday 3 April 2009

Course Director: Stephen Trow (English Heritage)

The historic environment is fundamental to the character and prosperity of the countryside and its continued conservation is inextricably linked to land use and agricultural policy. At a time of significant change in rural public policy, this course takes a broad view of the issues and examines the linkages between policy, research and practical outcomes which will shape the countryside of 21st century England.

Fee: £350.00 residential with meals, £300.00 non-residential with meals, £275.00 non-residential without meals.

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7267

 

Area Assessments of the Historic Environment

Wednesday 8 April 2009

Course Director: Dr Adam Menuge (English Heritage)

Area assessments aim to ensure that historical understanding informs the management of change in the built environment not just at the level of individual buildings but across the small and medium-scale historic landscapes that constitute ‘places’, particularly when these are faced by rapid change or steady incremental loss. They aim to provide an overview of the historical development and architectural character of towns, suburbs and rural settlements and an assessment of their current state and future value. This course will introduce the principles and methods of area assessments and provide practical guidance on their implementation – this will be particularly valuable in a climate of Housing Market Renewal Initiatives.

Fee: £135.00 with lunch, £125.00 without lunch

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7268

 

Historic Gardens, Parks and Designed Landscapes: Identifying Threats and Developing Strategies for their Conservation

Thursday 16 – Friday 17 April 2009

Course Director: John Watkins (English Heritage)

Recent research (including Heritage at Risk, 2008) has shown that many of England’s historic gardens, parks and designed landscapes, both urban and rural, are at risk from development pressures and decline. This situation has arisen due to under-investment and a deficit of skills to effectively manage and maintain them. This course aims to examine and understand these threats and challenges whilst identifying and evaluating strategies and solutions for protecting, conserving and managing sites.

Fee: £350.00 residential with meals, £300.00 non-residential with meals, £275.00 non-residential without meals.

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7269

 

Archaeology Survey Week

Monday 4 May – Friday 8 May 2009

Course Directors: Mark Bowden and Trevor Pearson (English Heritage)

Analytical survey of earthwork sites and historic landscapes has a vital role to play in archaeological interpretation and conservation strategies. This five-day practical course includes a major fieldwork component, with ample opportunity for hands-on experience and the development of a range of appropriate survey skills. The tutors are archaeological field investigators from English Heritage.

Fee: £740.00 residential with meals, £540.00 non-residential with meals, £425.00 non-residential without meals.

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7270

 

Planning and the Historic Environment: The Pastoral Amendment Measure

Friday 15 May 2009

Course Director: Dr Paul Barnwell (OUDCE)

This is an annual course that explores current issues relevant to the historic environment. The theme for 2009 will be the Pastoral Amendment Measure, with a particular focus on its provision for, and the impact of, the sharing of Anglican places of worship between religious and secular activities.

Fee: £100.00 with lunch, £90.00 without lunch.

www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7271

 

Building Survey Week

Monday 25 – Friday 29 May 2009

Course Directors: Robert Hook and Dr Adam Menuge (English Heritage)

This five-day practical course will provide a general introduction to the understanding of historic buildings. The course will have an emphasis on practical, ‘portable’ skills and covers observation, investigation, analysis and recording of historic buildings. The tutors are historic building specialists from English Heritage.

Fee: £740.00 residential with meals, £540.00 non-residential with meals, £425.00 non-residential without meals.

Further details and booking instructions at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/x7272

 

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